Global Disc Fertilizer Granulator Market Report, History and Forecast 2014-2025, Breakdown Data by Manufacturers, Key Regions, Types and Application

In this report, the Global Disc Fertilizer Granulator market is valued at USD XX million in 2017 and is expected to reach USD XX million by the end of 2025, growing at a CAGR of XX% between 2017 and 2025. Global Disc Fertilizer Granulator market has been broken down by major regions, with complete market estimates on the basis of products/applications on a regional basis. Browse full research report at https://www.crystalmarketreport.com/global-disc-fertilizer-granulator-market-report-history-and-forecast-2014-2025-breakdown-data-by-manufacturers-key-regions-types-and-application Disc Fertilizer Granulator is composed by disc, driving device, rack, pedestal, scraper etc. It is mainly used for producing organic/inorganic compound fertilizer or single-quality fertilizer into round ball granules. The global Disc Fertilizer Granulator market was xx million US$ in 2018 and is expected to xx million US$ by the end of 2025, growing at a CAGR of xx% between 2019 and 2025. This report studies the Disc Fertilizer Granulator market size (value and volume) by players, regions, product types and end industries, history data 2014-2018 and forecast data 2019-2025; This report also studies the...

Farmers testing new fertilizer alternative: bacteria

When Joel Mathiowetz started planting corn this spring on his farm near Morton, Minn., he added the usual starter fertilizer to boost plant growth. But then he added something new: bacteria, right there in the soil alongside the corn seeds. Mathiowetz is one of a handful of farmers in Minnesota who are testing the approach on their corn fields. The bacteria, which have been genetically modified and developed by California-based Pivot Bio, will help the corn plants convert nitrogen from the atmosphere into a form the corn plants can use as fertilizer. The idea is to eventually replace synthetic nitrogen fertilizer with microbes. They’re not commercially available in Minnesota yet, but Mathiowetz is in his second year of testing the microbes on his farm. It’s a fairly simple process: “I push some fish food-looking material into a solution and activate the microbes prior to applying it to our field,” said Mathiowetz, who raises corn, soybeans and peas with several family members on 2,500 acres in southern Minnesota. Last year, the test plots where he used the microbes produced six bushels of corn more per acre than the fields where he used only fertilizer. ...